Driving license in Thailand

Get a Thai driving licence Pattaya
(Assistance Fee: 3,500 Baht)

If you are planning to have a trip and if you decide to stay here for more than 3 months you will need a Thai driving licence, even though international driver licenses are legally accepted.
Each country has its own rules and differences. Driving in Thailand is a good way to get off the beaten track, but there are a few things to be aware of before you hit the road.
While hectic in places, especially main cities, Thailand’s road system is generally quite good and well signposted with traffic signs, warning signs and regulatory signs in both Thai and English. Driving on open roads at night is not recommended, however, due to the increased number of heavy goods vehicles at this time. Truck drivers, in particular, have gained a reputation for not respecting car users, while motorbikes also pose a particular hazard as they weave in and out of larger vehicles.
You can get a Thai Driving Licence by yourself but the forms are written in Thai, so non-Thai-speakers its recommended that you take along a Thai speaker for interpretation and to help fill in the forms.
If you wish to be able to drive both cars and motorcycles in Thailand, then you’ll have to apply for 2 separate driving permits, and you’ll be issued 2 different physical cards
You may need help? It is definitely a lot easier to let J & E Concierge assist you with the whole process
-Thai National- Thai Driving Licence in Pattaya available every Wednesday!
-Foreign National- Thai Driving Licence available every Tuesday and Friday!
Roads are designed with scant regard for safety – Mainly concerned with the maximum volume of traffic, even new roads are poorly designed and encourage speeding. Dual carriageways seldom have Armco barriers in the center, relying on trees or concrete to deal with aberrant vehicles.

CALL US – 081 865 8910
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Motorbike Driving licence

The most important thing to consider when it comes to driving in Thailand is to ensure that you have the right license for the vehicle you’ve chosen. Whether it’s a car or a big bike, having a license that qualifies you to drive is the bare minimum precaution to take. That’s why J & E Concierge is here to assist.
If you wish to be able to drive both cars and motorcycles in Thailand, then you’ll have to apply for 2 separate driving permits, and you’ll be issued 2 different physical cards.

Be careful in traffic

It should go without saying, but in a country, like Thailand, it’s important to ensure that you’re always wearing your seat belt. Whilst Thai law only mandates that front-seat passengers wear a seat belt, given the state of the roads and the often awful driving abilities of those using them, it’s better to wear a belt wherever you’re sat to protect you in the event of an accident. On top of this, there are several other laws you’ll need to be aware of, from turning left on red to the speed limits on different roads. There are many cars, motorbike, and jeep rental firms, including many international firms. While it is legal to drive in Thailand with a valid licence from most countries, it’s worth noting that most companies will not give you a car or provide you with insurance without a Thai international driver’s licence. This licence and a valid passport must be carried at all times while driving.
There’s seemingly no lack of them. Many Thais have no awareness of road rules and probably don’t even have a driver’s license. It is extremely easy to pass a driving test in Thailand.
You also have

– drunk drivers.
– teenagers.
– Baht bus drivers on energy drinks (and that’s IF it’s an energy drink).
– tourists with no Thai driving experience.
– drunk pedestrians.
That’s driving in Pattaya: People will- pull out in front of you without looking.
– stop for no apparent reason.
– ride their motorbike at 50 KM an hour with one hand while talking on the mobile phone.
– ride the wrong way up the road into oncoming traffic.
– pass you on either side at full speed.
– weave through traffic like immortals.
– and much more impressive.

Pattaya road

You also must know that in Thailand people drive on the left side of the road. On many rural roads, you’ll occasionally happen upon motorcycles, cars and even 12-wheel trucks maneuvering against one-way traffic.
If you ask a Thai why he prefers to drive on the wrong side of the road, against the traffic on the “emergency” lane, rather than take the next U-turn which is 2 kilometers away, his answer will probably be somewhere along the line of “ki kiaet pai U-turn”. If you ask this Thai girl why she doesn’t wear a helmet, maybe she will reply “ki kiaet sai”. Now ask this truck driver why he didn’t put on his turn signal before he turned and he may reply “ki kiaet peut”.
”Ki kiaet” means lazy in Thai and it is a derogatory word, like most words beginning by ki-. I’m not saying Thai people are lazy, but we can safely say that generally speaking, they drive in a lazy way. It means that they choose the easiest, smoothest way to do things, not the safest, or not the most considerate. So I think that the “ki kiaet” attitude, whether you choose to translate it as lazy, or easy, or just “ki kiaet”, is a good way to understand the way Thai people drive. They are not lazy people, but they drive lazily, they choose the easy way to do things. That’s why you see them drive on the wrong side of the road instead of driving 2 kilometers to the next U-turn, that’s why they can enter a gas station through the exit or exit through the entrance, and that’s why they do all the crazy and dangerous things you see them doing.

J & E Concierge is here to assist.
We can assist Thai citizens and foreign Nationals in getting a Thai driving licence in Pattaya.

CALL US – 081 865 8910
CONTACT US
2019-08-13T09:24:14+00:00
Last updated on: 18.08.2019 – 7:36

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